• 28Aug

    Last week was the Washington State International Kite Festival here on the Long Beach Peninsula.

    The beach approach is lined with vendors.

    It’s traditional in my family to have mini-donuts during the Kite Festival!

    But the real action is on the beach!

    There are people and kites everywhere.

    All of these photos were taken by Keith Schwartz from Beachdog.

    He even went up in the City of Long Beach’s Fire Department bucket truck for some great aerial views.

    This gives you an idea of how big some of the kites are!

    We have a boardwalk near the edge of the dunes.  A great place to watch the action!

    We also have a dune trail that’s a part of the Lewis and Clark trail.

    There are some great historical markers along the trail.

    I wonder what Lewis would think of all these kites!  Hmmm…..I wonder if Lewis knew Ben Franklin?

    These kites are called “revs.”

    A new world record was set at this year’s Festival-64 kite flyers and 64 kites.  It beats the old record of 54 set in Bristol, UK

    The kites were flown to the music “Eye in the Sky” from the Alan Parson’s Project.

    The formations were amazing.  It was like kite ballet!

    So were these.

    And these reminded me of the Blue Angels.

    It was a fantastic week.

    Hope you can come next year!

  • 19Aug

    Two weeks ago Bob and I were headed to Kalispell, Montana.  For a change of scenery, we drove past Libby Dam, and through the town of Eureka.  Imagine my surprise when we discovered it was the Eureka Outdoor Quilt Show that very day!

    See the girl in the yellow vest?  She was part of the Quilt Police!  I guess there really are Quilt Police.

    There were more than 450 quilts displayed around town.

    And Eureka isn’t a very big town.

    But it sure is charming.

    Great looking new buildings.

    Lots of “Western” themed quilts in the show.

    You’ll see another member of the Quilt Police in this photo.  They were everywhere, but it wasn’t an unruly crowd, so they didn’t have much to do.

    The quilts looked fabulous out in the sun.

    I love this center medallion with the delectable mountain blocks around it.

    There is a lot of work in the medallion quilt!

    I recognize this Sunbonnet Sue and Sam quilts as having been made from an Eleanor Burns pattern.  I did one myself years ago.

    Tennessee Waltz is always impressive.  You see curves even though there really aren’t any!

    This quilter really achieved a “fractured” look with her choice of color placement.

    The edge of this Double Four-Patch really adds interest to the design.

    A pretty Picket Fence border here.

    In my opinion, brights and black always look good together.

    Hollyhocks and nighttime sky?

    Lovely and interesting star quilt.

    This block brought a smile to my face!

    Another great center medallion block.

    And another Tennessee Waltz.

    I believe this Center Diamond quilt was done by an Amish woman from nearby Rexford, Montana.

    Isn’t this unusual and pretty?

    Believe it or not, this is a new quilt.  The quilt maker really captured the feel of an old wool quilt.

    Interesting Nine-Patch setting.

    I love the use of color here.

    Lovely cross stitch.

    Look at the amazing hand quilting on this quilt.

    And don’t you love the graphic design of the Jigsaw Puzzle quilts?

    This Bow Tie quilt is newly made, but made from vintage feedsacks.  It reminds me of my Tie One On quilt.

    It’s amazing how graphic a simple Nine-Patch can look when set on point like this.

    At the end of town is a public park filled with old buildings from the area.

    They were ALL decked out with quilts.

    The quilt at the top of the schoolhouse won the People’s Choice Award.

    The old library.

    It looked like a picture postcard!

    Even the train station was decked out.

    I think these two guys are doing their Lewis and Clark impression…”We proceeded on.”

    There were quilts no matter what direction you looked.

    It was a bit windy, but everything stayed secure.

    Layers of quilt….

    The irregular ends of the sashing strips on the Tulip Quilt are very interesting.

    Hunter’s Star.  I’m going to be teaching this at our Retreat this fall.

    This Broken Star with Lillies is a stunner.

    Of course I couldn’t resist the Thirties Sampler.

    The Flying Geese sashings on this quilt are so nice–and the quilting is very special.

    I’m a sucker for Pinwheel quilts.

    This pile of quilts was in the General Store.

    I was delighted to see Jackie Robinson at the show.  This is just one of the quilts she had displayed.

    This vintage Nine-Patch in a strippy setting looks like it was well loved and well used.

    More Pinwheels.  This time with an interesting alternate block setting.

    I think String Quilts are my new favorites!

    Fabulous Art Deco design.

    After two hours of looking at quilts, I could have used a “Moosage,” but it was time to head down the road!

  • 16Aug

    Bob and I just enjoyed a great week in and around Kalispell,  Montana.  I always know we’re getting close to “home” when we start seeing signs for the Clarkfork!  CLARKFORK!

    For a change of scenery, we went through Libby.  There are several of these eagles around the town.  They’re quite impressive.

    And the river is very rocky!

    Bob had good luck fishing, though!

    We decided to take an even more scenic route and go past Libby Dam.

    It’s on the Kootenai River.

    It was built in 1975 and Bob remembers traveling through the area before the dam was built.

    The reservoir behind the dam backs up for 90 miles–clear into Canada!  The  lake is called Lake Koocanusa–Koo for Kootenai, Can for Canada and Usa for USA!

    It was really windy.

    If you don’t believe me, ask this tree.

    Good to know!

    They aren’t kidding.

    Rock is everywhere!

    I wondered what these big plants were.

    Turns out they’re called mullen.  They were very plentiful!

    I couldn’t resist snapping this  photo.

    As we got closer to Kalispell, someone had planted orange flowers–just for me, I’m sure.

    I love these old granaries.

    Maybe they’re common in farming areas, but they are unusual for me.

    Gotta snap a barn or two!

    Along the rivers we saw lots of osprey nests.

    We visited Flathead Lake.

    This is called a Bruck–a bus/truck combination.  It took passengers and freight from Kalispell to Whitefish to catch the train.

    We met some people who live on Whitefish Lake–this is their incredible view.

    They took us on a two hour boat ride around the lake.  Amazing vistas and amazing homes.

    Of course you can’t be this close without a visit to Glacier National Park.  This year  is the 100th anniversary of the park.

    Cool, huh?

    We drove the Going to the Sun Road.

    Photo op!

    There were about 6 mountain goats sunning themselves here, but no place to pull over to get a good photo, so took this  out the window of the car.

    Glacier is an amazing place.  If you don’t believe in global warming, how’s this for a statistic.  100 years ago there were 200 glaciers in Glacier Park.  Today there are only 50.

    A sign to add to my neon sign file.

    And it’s good to know that Montana is open!

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  • 15Aug

    Finally, I can tell!

    Back in April, I had a crew here from Quilts and More magazine, doing a photo shoot in my studio!  It was incredibly fun.

    The crew included Adam and Joe….

    …and Elizabeth.

    Sometimes Joe was my stand-in.  Imagine having a stand-in!

    Sometimes I had to do the work.

    It was fun to peek over their shoulders and see how fantastic their photos are.

    Now the magazine is finally out.  It’s on newsstands now, or you can order it from me.

    It has the Getting to Know Karen Snyder feature written by Linzee  McCray….

    …and a table runner that I’ve designed, called Center Piece.  They even asked me to provide kits for it!

    There’s more to this story, but I can’t tell yet!

  • 02Aug

    Way back in 1974, when I was 20 and my Grandma Ikey was 90, I was getting married.  Grandma Ikey had two Nine-Patch quilt tops that she had made several years before and tucked away.  One was supposed to be for my brother when he got married, and the other for my cousin Jim when he got married–her two grandsons.  However, I was the first to get married, so Grandma gave one to me as a wedding gift.

    This quilt became very special to me, because my other grandma, my Grandma Kennedy, and the members of her Ladies Aid Society, did the quilting on it.  I slept under this quilt for years, had it dry cleaned a few time–I didn’t know any better–and have always treasured it.  My brother did get the other one, also finished by the Ladies Aid, and his is in pristine condition.

    I always said that someday I’d be a quilter.  About 1993, I got a free quilt pattern in the mail.  It was from Oxmoor House and was for a Grandmother’s Flower Garden.  I thought, “I should make this.  And I should make it king sized so it will fit my bed!”  Ah, ignorance was bliss!  I also remembered that my mom had given me some old fabric and blocks from my Grandma Ikey after she passed away, and that among them were some Flower Garden blocks.  Amazingly, I opened a drawer in my storage room, and there they were–16 Flower Garden blocks, or at least the components to make them.  I knew I wanted to use them in my first quilt!  It took me 2-1/2 years, but I finished that king sized top.

    As I was working with the blocks that Grandma Ikey had made (I had to take them apart and re-cut them as they were a different size than my pattern) I began to think that some of the fabrics looked familiar.  I was pretty sure they were the same as some in my Nine-Patch.  So, I got it out and started to compare.  Sure enough, there were some duplicates!  Like this yellow and green flower print.

    There was also this cute little blue flower.

    You can see it’s more faded in the Nine-Patch.

    Sometimes there were only enough hexagons for a half block, but that worked great for the edges of the Flower Garden.

    Well yesterday, Bob and I and my parents visited our cousin Betty, whom we rarely see.

    She had two quilts that our Grandma Ikey had made!  This star quilt.

    And this fan quilt!

    I was thrilled to see them, but even more excited when I started recognizing some old friends among the prints!  The white daisies on this pink background really speaks to me–I’ve always loved daisies.  Here it is in Betty’s star quilt….

    …and in my Nine-Patch quilt…..

    …and in my Flower Garden quilt!

    This very abstract blue print was in one of the stars…

    …and in my Nine-Patch.

    The other print in this star was also familiar.

    It’s not only in my Nine-Patch….

    …Grandma Ikey made my baby doll a dress from this print!

    And here it appears with a blue paisley…

    …which is also in my Nine-Patch.

    This fan blade had lots of matches to my quilts.  The center blade with the little Lemoyne Stars print….

    …made its way into my Nine-Patch, although it’s much more faded here.

    And the dark brown with the aqua flowers….

    …is REALLY faded in my quilt.

    Did you notice the little tulip print in the above block?  It turns out Dolly has a dress made from that print, too!  I love her rick rack!

    INSERTED 8/3  My sister emailed me last night.  She had gotten her dolls out to check out their dresses, and here’s what she found–and said.

    Here are Chatty Baby and Chatty Cathy all decked out in their tulip dresses.  Please note that my dolls can stand up by themselves, because they are not missing any legs.  Chatty Baby is upset, because she can’t find her scarf.  (I suspect the reason Chatty Cathy is looking away from Baby is because Cathy lost her own scarf and stole Baby’s.)

    Then this morning Sally emailed me this….Chatty Cathy has a headache this morning from wearing the scarf too tight. Serves her right, I think.

    How do you like the blue gingham sundresses?

    I love the pink gingham — wide rick-rack for Cathy and narrow rick-rack for Baby.

    Does the white fabric with yellow roses look familiar, SW?

    As a matter of fact, it does.  It’s in my Flower Garden quilt!  Thanks, Sally, for sharing!

    The dainty blue flowers, next to the bottom blade…

    …make an appearance in the Flower Garden quilt.

    And the last blade, with it’s wild pink, red and black combination…

    …shows up in the Flower Garden quilt.  I think Dolly had a dress from this, too, but I don’t seem to have it.  Maybe my sister does.

    And one of my favorite prints, which I remember is in my brother’s quilt too, is the gray and red one.

    It’s in both of my quilts….

    …and Betty’s fan quilt.

    It’s amazing the connections among these four quilts–five if you count my brother’s.

    Yesterday my mom told me that Grandma Ikey once said that when she and her niece, Elsie (who was two years older, but that’s another story) would buy fabric for a project, before they even cut into it, they were planning what they’d make from the scraps!  Spoken like a true quilter.

    And I have one more quilt to show you that’s from Grandma Ikey.  This is the crib quilt she made when my brother was born, and that Mom used on all three of us kids.