• 30Jan
    Categories: Everything! Comments: 0

    I found a wonderful site describing Nås dräkten.  Here’s the link:

    http://alltomhemslojd.se/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/nåsdräkt+…pdf

    The descriptions are very detailed, and the photos wonderful!

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    I like the variations in the apron and shawl.

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    I don’t know which is cuter–the hat or the little girl!

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    This woman’s hat is crocheted.

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    Here are a couple of purses and a belt.

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    I’m hoping to learn to crochet well enough to make myself a heart warmer.  As a little aside, the Swedish for heart warmer is “hjärtvärmare.”  It’s not too much of a stretch to translate “hjärt” to “heart” and “värmare” to warmer, but when I was using Google Translate for this article, the translation came out “cardiac heater!”  ;-)

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    These gents are looking dapper in the suede knickers and wool vests.

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    Here’s a closeup of the back of the man’s vest.  I love how the fabric is cut on the bias and the stripes matched.

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    Too bad these beautiful suspenders are usually hidden under the vest.

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    The men have a green wool jacket with beautifully crocheted sleeves.

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    But I’ve saved the best for last–these adorable children’s “dresses” worn by both boys and girls.  The “bib” is reversible–sounds like a good idea!

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  • 24Jan
    Categories: musings Comments: 4

    Nåsdräkten literally means, “the dress from Nås.

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    Nås is the village in Dalarna, Sweden where my ancestors lived.

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    Each village, or parish, had its own costume…

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    …with its own distinct components, like the style of this bodice.

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    Or the cut of the scarf.

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    Many, like the Nås dress, have tatting on the blouse.

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    There are variations within the parish, like these neckerchiefs.

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    They are still stitched by hand.

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    The wool skirt sometimes has a red band…

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    …and always has a crocheted edge,

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    although there are many designs for the crochet!

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    The apron also has many variations.  Some designs were specific for certain holidays, feast days, weddings, etc.

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    There is a cap which is tied under the chin, on the left side.

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    Only married women have lace on their caps.

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    Here’s a cap that is made completely from crochet.

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    The purse is beautifully embroidered and worn half hidden by the apron–a sign of modesty.

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    I was honored when my Swedish relatives had a Nåsdräkt made for me in 1984.

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    The man’s frock coat can be white…

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    …or black.

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    Photo credits:

    folklorefashion.durantextiles.com

    margaretajonth.com

    sverigesfolkdrakter.se

    You can see more photos on my Pinterest board devoted to the Nas dress and fin direct links to the original websites for the photos.  http://pinterest.com/karenannalena/swedish-nasdrakt/

  • 15Jan

    Last month the Longview, Washington library had a red and white quilt show.

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    It meant a snowy, 150 mile round trip drive from here, but I’m so glad we went.

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    I’ll just be quiet and let you enjoy the show!

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  • 01Jan

    It’s time for another Quilt Block A Month.  You can join the fun by ‘liking” the page on Facebook.

    The block for this quarter is the Spool Block.  It offers a lot of options and is quick and easy to piece.  If you do just one block a day, you’ll have a 78 blocks finished before the first day of spring!

     

    This is a great way to use your scraps.  All you need is: 2) 2-1/2″ x 7-1/2″ brown rectangles, 4) 1-1/2″ light squares, 2) 1-1/2″ x 5-1/2″ light rectangles and a 5-1/2″ center square—either plain or pieced.  I like using a stripe because it looks like thread wrapped around the spool.

     

    Some people like to mark their squares with a diagonal pencil line when doing sew-and-flip corners, but I just finger press them–quick and easy!

    Add a square to opposite ends of the brown rectangle.

    Stitch, trim and press.  Note:  I didn’t trim the background fabric away.  It makes it a bit bulky, but I also think it stabilizes it.  Your choice!  Do this with both brown rectangles.

    Add the white rectangles to the sides of the 5-1/2″ square.

    Now add the brown rectangles to the top and bottom, making sure the light areas match up.  Voila!  You have a spool block!  The unfinished block is 7-1/2″ x 9-1/2″.

    Now, here’s where the fun comes in.  You can do all kinds of things with the center square.  You could sew 5) 1-1/2″ x 5-1/2″ strips together to make it look like thread wrapped around your spool.

     

    How about using random width strips on an angle to represent the thread?  I foundation pieced this.

     

    Do you save selvedges?  This is a great place to use them!

    Here are the four sample blocks I made.  I’ll play with setting possibilities when I have more finished.

     

    They do make an interesting design when set next to each other.  You get some secondary action going on!

     

    I hope you’ll join us!